How To Change Your Christmas Tree into a ‘Valentines Tree’

How To Change Your Christmas Tree into a ‘Valentines Tree’

Image sources @your_life_styled @christianson__creations @amanda_8619

Christmas may be over, but that doesn’t mean you can’t keep your Christmas tree up for longer. 

Christmas trees and decorations are usually taken down on twelfth night, which is either the 5th or 6th of January (depending on when you count from). 

A new trend on Instagram has seen people repurpose their Christmas tree into a ‘Valentines Tree’ — and we are absolutely here for it. 

The trend has become increasingly popular with over 3,600 uploading photos to Instagram using the hashtag #ValentinesTree

So how do you make a Valentines Tree?

There are no hard and fast rules to creating a Valentines Tree, but you will of course need a tree.  Simply replace your festive decorations and adorn them with something a little more romantic. Swap the candy canes for candy hearts, reindeer for teddy bears, wreaths for roses, and angels for cupid. 

Take a look below for some inspiration!

Add Hearts

One of the ways you can easily turn your tree into a Valentines Tree is by removing your Christmas themed decorations and replacing them with hearts. @Aimtobeorganized2017 on Instgram has opted to retain their fairy lights and added some lovely red hearts which have been complemented with smaller silver coloured heart decorations.

@Aimtobeorganized2017 said “My husband didn’t want to take down the Christmas tree so I made it a Valentine’s tree. Normally I don’t even decorate for Valentine’s Day but if 2020 taught me anything…love gets you through the tough times so why not have a love tree for a couple months?”

Make It Pink

White and pink artificial trees lend themselves well to being repurposed for Valentines, so if like @amanda_8619 you’ve got one, simply decorate in a way that captures the Valentines theme. If you don’t have a pink tree you could make some pink garland or ribbon to put around your tree.

Use Teddy Bears

Teddy bears can make a great addition to your Valentines Tree, small ones can be placed within the tree or used as a topper, while larger and heavier cuddly toys can be placed under the tree.

Use Old Valentines Day Cards

Decorate your Valentines Tree using cards from previous Valentines Day’s. Simply find some old Valentines Day cards, or purchase some new ones and add them to your tree using pegs, and voila, you have a Valentines Tree.

No Christmas Tree? Decorate A Plant Instead

There are no hard and fast rules to making your own Valentines Tree, so if you don’t have a Christmas tree to repurpose, you can use pretty much any plant you may have.

Real vs Fake Trees: Which Is Best for the Environment?

Real vs Fake Trees: Which Is Best for the Environment?

Ah, Christmas. The most wonderful time of the year, as many recall. When you picture a perfect Christmas, it’s not uncommon to think of gathering around with your family and decorating your tree.

You may be gearing up to buy yourself an artificial tree, or perhaps you’re more a fan of buying a real tree from Christmas tree farms. But did you ever stop to think about the environmental impact?

If you’ve been sat at home with a mug of mulled wine, wondering whether a real or fake tree is more eco-friendly, wonder no more!

We take you through everything you need to know about real versus fake Christmas trees ensuring you can have a holly, jolly, eco-friendly Christmas!

We’ll be breaking down the key issues with each tree so you can make an informed decision this Christmas.

Let’s get to it!

The Christmas Tree Debate

In our eco-conscious modern times, people are more and more concerned about whether real trees are more environmentally-friendly than artificial ones. It’s true, both types have their benefits and drawbacks.

Whether you’re more concerned about the aesthetics and making sure your tree doesn’t clash with your brand new rug, or you’re anxious about the inevitable spill of pine needles, you’ll have been considering this Crimbo conundrum before eco-consciousness was cool.

However, now that environmental impacts are being considered, there’s a lot to think about! Many people consider artificial trees to be more environmentally-friendly than a genuine one, and you’d be forgiven for thinking so.

Unfortunately, it’s a lot more complicated than that!

The Facts

Did you know that, according to The Carbon Trust, you’d have to use an artificial tree for at least 10 years in order to have the same level of carbon footprint as a real Christmas tree?

If you didn’t – and we don’t blame you – have a read below of our pros and cons of each type of tree. We’ve compiled the most reputable information around to show you some truths you may not have considered!

Artificial Trees

Whilst artificial pines are certainly less messy than real trees, given that you don’t have stray pine needles clogging up your hoover, they’re not actually as eco-friendly as you’d initially expect.

According to the Carbon Trust, the average artificial Christmas tree is made of PVC plastic. This comes from oil – immediately meaning that these types have a higher level of emitted carbon.

What’s more, you’ll want to consider where your tree ends up after usage. Artificial types are non-recyclable and will end up in a landfill whether you’ve used them for the recommended ten years, or a single year.

Real Christmas Trees

Despite popular belief, a real tree actually is better for the environment.

Most of these pines are purposely planted for the occasion, on purpose-built farms. This means that they’re grown safely and are not ripped out of a forest, as you might imagine.

What’s more, authentic pines are 100% recyclable! They’re also not going to cause any harmful greenhouse gas emissions, meaning all in all the level of carbon dioxide emissions will be much lower.

The Verdict

As always, we know there are numerous factors to consider. Authentic pines look and smell incredible, whilst fake ones are an easy way to cut costs.

However, if you’re truly looking to slash your carbon emissions – go natural.

2020 Christmas Lights & Decorations Expenditure Report

2020 Christmas Lights & Decorations Expenditure Report

Christmas lights in Manchester – image source

 

With Christmas just around the corner, festive lights and decorations are being prepared to illuminate towns and cities across the UK, to spread some much-needed Christmas cheer.

 

With that in mind, here at Christmastrees.co.uk we wanted to find out how much towns and cities were spending on their Christmas festivities.

 

Based on information received via Freedom of Information requests, we’ve created the 2020 Christmas Lights & Decorations Expenditure Report.

 

The report ranks the average spend on Christmas lights and decorations in towns and cities across the UK as a proportion of their population.

 

Here’s what we found.

 

Average Spend Is £292 Per Thousand People

 

Towns and cities across the UK are spending an average of £292 for every thousand people on Christmas lights and decorations — that’s an average of 29p per person.

 

Glasgow Revealed As Biggest Overall Spender

Christmas lights in George Square, Glasgow – image source
When it comes to spending on Christmas, the Scottish city of Glasgow was shown to be the most generous, with an average spend per year of £419,685.

 

Taking into account population size, Glasgow ranked 2nd with a spend per thousand of £663 — just over twice as much as the national average.

 

Dundee Revealed As Biggest Spender As Proportion Of Population

Christmas lights in Dundee – image source

 

When it came to the highest overall spend Dundee ranked 5th with an average spend of £188,913.

 

Taking into account the population of Dundee, approximately 150,000 people, the city punched well above its weight with an average spend of £1,274 per thousand — more than four times the national average of £293.

 

Barnsley Revealed As Lowest Overall Spender and Lowest As Proportion Of Population

Christmas decorations outside Barnsley Town Hall – image source

 

At the other end of the scale, Barnsley was ranked as the least generous spender for Christmas lights and decorations with an average spend of £6,128 per year.

 

The South Yorkshire town also ranked the lowest as a proportion of population with a spend of £25 per thousand — more than 10 times lower than the national average.

 

Top 5 Highest Spending Cities and Towns for Christmas Lights and Decorations

 

1. Dundee — £1,274 per thousand people.

 

The city spends an average of £188,913 per year, and is expecting to spend slightly less this Christmas with an estimated budget of £181,000.

 

2. Glasgow — £663 per thousand people.

 

Another Scottish city makes it into the top 5 with an average yearly spend of £419,685. Our report also shows that projected figures for this Christmas are likely to be around £343,000.

 

3. Leicester — £588 per thousand people.

 

The East Midlands city spends double the national average of £292 per thousand people and an average of £204,904 per year, projected spend is expected to fall slightly to £200,000 this Christmas.

 

4. Sutton Coldfield — £565 per thousand people.

 

The suburban town in Birmingham spends an average of £53,749 per year on festive decorations, and is projected to increase their spending this year to £105,000.

 

5. Kingston upon Hull — £487 per thousand people.

 

The city in East Yorkshire spends an average of £126,611 and with an estimated population of 260,000 is one of the top five spenders for Christmas lights, spending 1.5 times more than the national average.

 

Top 5 Lowest Spending Cities and Towns for Christmas Lights and Decorations

 

1. Barnsley — £25 per thousand people.

 

Barnsley was ranked as the least generous spender for Christmas lights and decorations with an average spend of £6,128 per year.

 

The South Yorkshire town also ranked the lowest as a proportion of population with a spend of £25 per thousand — more than 10 times lower than the national average.

 

2. Bury — £44 per thousand people.

 

Second for the lowest spend per thousand was Bury, the market town in Greater Manchester spends an average of £8,337 a year, and is predicted to spend just £7,000 this Christmas.

 

3. Eastbourne — £76 per thousand people.

 

The seaside resort spends an average of £7,385 a year, making the town the second lowest overall spender, however the town ranks 3rd lowest when taking its smaller population into account with a spend of £76 per thousand. Which is just under 4 times the national average.

 

4. St Albans — £78 per thousand people.

 

The city in Hertfordshire spends an average of £11,505 a year, and with a population of around 150,000 means the city spends just £78 per thousand. However, this year the city is predicting to triple it’s average spend, and has budgeted £34,010 for spending on Christmas lights and decorations.

 

5. Basingstoke — £81 per thousand people.

 

Basingstoke has an average spend of £14,168 per year for Christmas lights and decorations, spending £81 per thousand and placing it in 5th place as the least generous spender. The town is budgeted to increase spend marginally this year to £14,800.

 

Methodology

 

FOI Requests

We contacted over 100 authorities for cities and towns through Freedom of Information requests

 

We asked them

 

1) The budget allocated by the council for Christmas decorations (such as lights, baubles, Christmas trees etc) for this year (2020).

 

2) The figures detailing the amount of money spent on Christmas decorations per year since 2015.

 

Average Spend

Average spend data for each town and city are based on the average spend for the past five years from 2015 to 2019 made available by each authority via Freedom of Information requests (unless otherwise stated*). In instances where the full data for the five-year period has not been made available, an average of the data and years where data was made available has been calculated.

 

*Data for Brighton and Canterbury was obtained from their respective business improvement districts (BID).

 

Population

Population figures for cities and towns are based on the 2018 and Mid 2019 population estimates by the Office for National Statistics (unless otherwise stated).

 

Link to the full data and sources can be found here.